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Crestline, Ohio

Crestline (On the highway since 1921) Population: 5,000

Crestline came into being as a railroad center in 1851. It was a major crossroad of the nation's Big Four railroads until the 1970's. Many of the town's early historic buildings fell victim to urban renewal in the 1970s. A few still exist, such as the Holcker Hardware Store on Seltzer St., in business since the late 1800s. the "crest" in Crestline refers to the high point in town dividing the Lake Erie and Ohio River watersheds.

 

  • The Crestline Shunk Museum's collection of historic artifacts. 211 N Thoman St. (419) 683-3410
  • n 1923, two brick pillars (McMahon and Bement Markers) were built along the Lincoln Highway's path at the entrance of a then-new housing development. They are still in existence; located at the US 30 Lincoln Highway and Clink Boulevard intersection.
  • IHolcker Hardware, 320 N Seltzer St, 419-683-249
  •   Hunger Paynes Restaurant; east side of town
  • Just Jokin' Bar and Grill
  • Or one of the ice cream and sandwich stands (open during the summer).

The post 1920 route entered the county in Crestline on Co. Rd. 330 (Lincoln Highway). It then went through Leesville (take temporary leave from Co. Rd. 330 and follow Leesville Road). Rejoining US 330, follow to Bucyrus and Oceola to Wyandot County.

Crestline Railroad Roundhouse in it's height of activity. (now gone)

The Bement Pillar in 1922. Photo by Lincoln Highway Collection, Transportation History Collection, Special Collections Library, University of Michigan.

The Bement Pillar today.


The McMahon Pillar in 1922. Photo by Lincoln Highway Collection, Transportation History Collection, Special Collections Library, University of Michigan.

The McMahon Pillar today.

 

 

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